Capital gains tax hike would cripple investment

Increasing the federal tax would be anti-investment, anti-entrepreneurship, anti-innovation and anti-green

Capital gains tax hike would cripple investmentBy Niels Veldhuis and Jake Fuss The Fraser Institute At a time when the country faces momentous economic challenges, it’s hard to think of a more damaging policy than a capital gains tax hike. Yet rumours persist that prior to the COVID-19 crisis and economic downturn, that’s exactly what the federal government planned to do.…

Trudeau tax relief plan will do little for economic growth

Trudeau tax relief plan will do little for economic growthBy Jake Fuss and Finn Poschmann The Fraser Institute According to a Parliamentary Budget Officer (PBO) report released this week, the federal government’s plan to increase the basic personal income tax deduction will cost nearly $7 billion annually when fully implemented. This is not only higher than what the Liberals anticipated during last fall’s election…

Federal finances perilous but Morneau oblivious

Canada’s economy is weakening with storm clouds on the horizon while federal finances are woefully unprepared for a recession

Federal finances perilous but Morneau obliviousBy Jason Clemens, Jake Fuss and Milagros Palacios The Fraser Institute It’s hard to recall a time when Canada’s finances were so perilously close to rapidly deteriorating with seemingly little or no interest in Ottawa. Federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau has been making the rounds since releasing the fall economic update last month, reassuring Canadians…

Federal finances on a razor’s edge

The federal government can’t continue to ignore the warning signs of a slowing economy. It should limit discretionary spending now

Federal finances on a razor’s edgeBy Tegan Hill and Jake Fuss The Fraser Institute The recently-released Economic and Fiscal Update demonstrates the federal government’s proclivity for marked increases in deficit-financed spending despite warning signs of a slowing economy. New borrowing and a larger deficit increase the risk to federal finances should a recession occur. The federal update pegs the deficit…

Federal government tax cuts miss the mark

We need smart tax cuts that improve incentives for workers, entrepreneurs and investors, along with a balanced budget

Federal government tax cuts miss the markBy Jason Clemens, Jake Fuss and Tegan Hill The Fraser Institute Finance Minister Bill Morneau recently confirmed the federal government’s intention to reduce personal income taxes for everyone except “higher-income earners.” With total taxes (federal, provincial and local) consuming 44.7 per cent of the average family’s income in 2019, it’s easy to see why Canadians…

Growing debt a clear and present danger to Canadian economy

Canada’s debt has grown faster than the economy. That dangerous pattern casts a shadow over the nation’s long-term financial health

Growing debt a clear and present danger to Canadian economyBy Alex Whalen and Jake Fuss The Fraser Institute Just before the holidays, the federal government released its fall economic update. It revealed that Canada’s federal debt-to-gross-domestic-product ratio increased in 2019, meaning Canada’s debt has grown faster than the economy. This is particularly important because the government chose the debt-to-GDP ratio to guide federal fiscal…

Tax bill an increasing burden for Canadian families

The cost of living was the number one concern for a third of all Canadians surveyed, according to a recent poll. And rising taxes contribute significantly to those costs

Tax bill an increasing burden for Canadian familiesBy Jake Fuss and Finn Poschmann The Fraser Institute A recent CBC News poll reported that the cost of living is one of the biggest issues worrying Canadians today. And yes, while trend inflation has been very low for a decade, it’s ticking up sharply. So although it’s easy to understand why Canadians are anxious…

CPP takes bigger bite from Canadians

But much of the justification for expanding the pension plan is debatable or downright wrong

CPP takes bigger bite from CanadiansBy Jason Clemens, Jake Fuss and Milagros Palacios The Fraser Institute Canadians likely noticed that their first paycheque of 2019 was slightly smaller than in 2018, even if they got a raise. The decline in after-tax income is because the first of several tax increases to finance an expanded Canada Pension Plan (CPP) took effect…

Canadian competitiveness lags because of U.S. tax reform

635,000 Canadian jobs, $85 billion in GDP and $20 billion in government revenue could be at risk

Canadian competitiveness lags because of U.S. tax reformBy Jake Fuss and Jason Clemens The Fraser Institute In professional sports, when a championship-calibre team adds another star player in the offseason, it has the potential to affect the level of competitiveness in the entire league. Tax changes can act in a similar way: when the United States implemented its tax reform policies in…