It’s time for Alberta professors and bureaucrats to take a pay cut

It’s unfair to make Albertans struggling through the pandemic to pay for bigger salaries for post-secondary employees

It’s time for Alberta professors and bureaucrats to take a pay cutMany bureaucrats and professors have been collecting bigger paycheques during the pandemic, which means bigger bills for struggling families and students at the worst possible time. More than 11,500 university and college employees received a pay raise in 2020, which cost taxpayers and students $29 million, according to freedom of information requests obtained by the…

Sugar-coating a sugar tax won’t make it any more palatable

If Newfoundland and Labrador pursues a sugar tax, it’s certainly not to get its people to lead healthier lives. It’s about paying bills

Sugar-coating a sugar tax won’t make it any more palatableIn its recent budget, the Newfoundland and Labrador government announced it will introduce a tax of 20 cents per litre on sugary drinks, starting on April 1, 2022. This a first in Canada. So far we know very little about how the tax would work, which products would be affected and how revenues from the…

How to cool Canada’s overheated housing market

To incentivize affordable housing, officials need to slash taxes and red tape

How to cool Canada’s overheated housing marketAs economists Jake Fuss and Tegan Hill have warned, the macro effects of government stimuli to address COVID-19 lockdowns are starting to emerge. In Canada, they have taken the form of an overheating housing market. With mortgage rates plunging to historic lows, the demand for residential real estate is driving prices through the roof. As…

Taxing the rich is the Trojan horse of politics

It’s not just the wealthy who will feel the pain

Taxing the rich is the Trojan horse of politicsAs the federal government’s debt soars by $424 million per day, Canadians need to be on guard for the Trojan horse of politics: higher taxes on the wealthy and businesses. These taxes won’t balance the budget. But they will make it easier for politicians to get their tax hikes through the city gates. And once…

Prairie provinces must put an end to rising debt

The current turmoil could weaken budgetary discipline, leading governments into long-term spending and increased debt

Prairie provinces must put an end to rising debtAt the end of 2020, Alberta’s debt was estimated at $98 billion, Manitoba’s was $28.6 billion and Saskatchewan’s stood at $15 billion. These debts are lower than Quebec’s ($220 billion) and Ontario’s ($448.9 billion), but there are concerns about their sustainability. Indeed, they’re a long-term burden for the governments, the taxpayers and the economy. Debt growth…

Consumers will pay for fed’s crusade against tech companies

Stop punishing consumers for the choices they make because simply they fail to conform to yours

Consumers will pay for fed’s crusade against tech companiesFor the past several months, the Trudeau government has been on a crusade against the so-called GAFA companies (Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon). Different government departments have stated that these tech giants are not paying their “fair share” in Canadian taxes and use news content without compensation. They are looking to the European GAFA tax…

Canada can manage its debt load by stretching out its loans

Locking in government bonds at current low interest rates, over extremely long terms, can help us manage our debt in challenging times

Canada can manage its debt load by stretching out its loansThe massive debt Canada’s federal government and other governments around the world took on to face the fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic is the elephant in the room. This debt could soon become intolerably hard to service, if interest rates revert to more historic levels or even escalate past those levels. Investors will demand higher…

Trudeau is sticking future generations with his spending bill

Babies born on budget day 2021 had more than $28,000 of debt the moment they opened their eyes

Trudeau is sticking future generations with his spending billBy Franco Terrazzano Canadian Taxpayers Federation and Kris Rondolo Generation Screwed Canadian babies born on federal budget day 2021 had more than $28,000 of debt the moment they opened their eyes. That’s each Canadian’s share of the federal government’s $1-trillion debt. And it’s going up. By the time those little ones blow out their candles…