Start preparing for the economic impact of Artificial Intelligence

With the hype reaching fever pitch, the key question comes down to how to fund tax revenue shortfalls and higher unemployment costs

Start preparing for the economic impact of Artificial IntelligenceThe hype around artificial intelligence (AI) is reaching fever pitch. Key questions explore how it might impact our lives and employment over the next five to 10 years. These lead to questions over how to fund tax revenue shortfalls and higher unemployment costs. In practice, it’s too early to know how fast AI will advance,…

The pipeline to the future doesn’t carry the jobs of the past

The ruckus over the Kinder Morgan project is a good reminder that the economic conditions we once enjoyed are on the way out

The pipeline to the future doesn’t carry the jobs of the pastWhile the opinion writers and politicians are venting about expanding the Kinder Morgan pipeline for diluted bitumen to the West Coast, it might help to consider some history. We didn’t arrive at this shout-fest without making diverse tracks from previous experiences, and most of us are old enough to think back over a few previous…

How to stop our top talent from fleeing south to find meaningful careers

With so few small and medium enterprises in Canada, who can blame Canadian tech students from going to the U.S. in search of opportunity?

How to stop our top talent from fleeing south to find meaningful careersConsiderable attention is being paid to the fact that much of Canada’s educated talent is moving to the U.S. to pursue employment, start companies, etc. While government can take steps to suppress brain drain, Canada must develop strategies to prevent other assets from also draining into the U.S. Experts suggest that jobs are best procured…

Here’s how sad grads can adapt to the modern job market

Don’t ask them for a job. Ask them if they have any projects or problems that someone with your abilities could help them with on a contract basis

Here’s how sad grads can adapt to the modern job marketWe’ve all heard of them, probably met them and maybe even live with one or two: the sad grads. These are the young people who did everything expected of them. They did their high school homework and matriculated with good grades. They put together a resume of part-time work, community work and references almost before…

How to get high-performance government

The private sector can help revolutionize government services by improving productivity, cutting costs and introducing new ideas

How to get high-performance governmentAmen to the ideas offered in It’s Time for High-Performance Government, written by Howard Risher and William Wilder and published in 2017. But how do we bring about high-performance government? The authors say it’s not about efficiency, it’s about engaging workers. And on that score, government is 30 years behind the curve. The 1990s began…

Ready to sell your business? Make sure it has value

Fifty-five per cent of businesses are going to transition to new owners or close in the next decade

Ready to sell your business? Make sure it has valueI recently gave a talk to a commercial real estate association. They asked me to talk about how they could sell more listed businesses. During the presentation, I asked them what percentage of businesses that are listed are actually sold. The response was “very few.” I wasn’t surprised. Not only is it hard to sell…

How do we play the mating game in the #MeToo era?

The workplace was once an acceptable place to find romance. Now it's a place to court misunderstanding and perhaps disaster

How do we play the mating game in the #MeToo era?My parents met during the Great Depression of the 1930s, when life was tough. They were both teachers in small prairie schools. My father was older than my mother and after a brief courtship they married. There’s nothing unusual about that story. In fact, it was very common. Many teachers met and married. In most…

Fracking moratoriums hold back struggling provinces

Across Canada, misguided populism is creating bad public policy, preventing the spreading of economic benefits to all citizens

Fracking moratoriums hold back struggling provincesMisguided moratoriums on hydraulic fracturing deny have-not provinces much-needed jobs and revenue, and deny citizens opportunities to relieve too-heavy tax burdens. British Columbia is the latest victim of the frenzy against fracking, a technique used to extract oil and gas from rock formations that has been safely used in Western Canada for more than 60…

Raising minimum wages: good intentions, bad policy

Raising the minimum wage is a flawed strategy for achieving the critically important social objective of raising people out of poverty

Raising minimum wages: good intentions, bad policyBy Charles Lammam and Hugh MacIntyre The Fraser Institute As the old saying goes, the road to hell is paved with good intentions. But good intentions alone aren’t enough to justify government policy. Real-world evidence matters. B.C. Premier John Horgan nonetheless recently announced plans to raise the province’s minimum wage by 34 per cent over…

Pipelines are crucial to national prosperity

The battle between Alberta and B.C. over the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion has broad implications for all Canadians

By Steve Lafleur and Ashley Stedman The Fraser Institute The governments of Alberta and British Columbia are waging an intense trade dispute over the proposed Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, which would run between Edmonton and Burnaby. But the implications extend far beyond those two provinces. The details of the feud have been well-documented. After B.C.’s…